Excel in Your Competition

Involvement in SkillsUSA’s Competitive Events programs offers members the opportunity to expand their leadership potential and develop skills for life necessary in families, communities, and careers. SkillsUSA has been serving students, educators and business and industry since 1965 by keeping up with both employers’ needs and education mandates and trends.

Business, industry and education partnerships thrive in curricula programs that require industry input in classroom standards.

Your parents might remember SkillsUSA as VICA–Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. VICA became SkillsUSA in 1998.

The Student Section of the National SkillsUSA website is a treasure trove of information and resources for student members including scholarships and chapter resources.

Oregon-Specific Events

Here are some of the technical skills events that SkillsUSA Oregon might offer. Please consult the SLSC Registration Guide for a complete list of events that will be offered this year. Events vary by year because of participation/interest level.

This competition requires a five- to seven-minute demonstration of an occupational skill in an area in which a student is training. Competitors use examples, experiments, displays, or practical operations to clearly explain their skills using competitor-prepared visual aids. A letter from an appropriate school official on school letterhead stating that the competitor is classified under the provisions of Public Law 105-17, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1997, is required for participation.

Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D Printing, embraces a wide range of materials and derivative processes to build parts suitable for end-use service. The virtually unlimited design freedom enabled by additive manufacturing allows for the creation of shapes and the integration of feature and function that previously required sub-assemblies. Employment opportunities for design engineers are growing as the industry adopts additive manufacturing methods and applies the practice to various parts of their business from prototyping to end use parts.

This competition tests technical skills and creative aptitude as though competitors worked for an advertising agency. In addition to a written test, competitors will recreate a provided advertisement on a computer. Competitors are judged on their accuracy, proficiency with industry software, and ability to meet a deadline. The competition also includes a creative portion. The creative portion involves the application of creative thinking and a design challenge. Layout, drawing, and illustration skills are used, as well as the ability to create vibrant, effective designs using a computer.

This is a professional portfolio competition documenting SkillsUSA chapters’ community service; patriotism and citizenship; and promotion of career and technical education projects that demonstrate a belief in the American way of life and the purposes of SkillsUSA.

Competitors will use their drafting skills to solve an architectural problem. The competition includes a written test, a hand sketch, and drawings that are either computer-generated or board drafted. The competition evaluates the competitors’ problem-solving abilities, not simply CAD skills.

Students will produce (plan, write, voice, record, edit, and render) up to a three minute radio production, such as a PSA, sound rich/NPR style news story, or a sound and interview news story. A 60-second streaming radio infomercial and 30-second ad spot will be produced and inserted into the production. The complete production requires students to demonstrate their ability to plan a project that meets a specific prompt and run time; and to gather, edit and mix a variety of audio sources. Competitors must render their completed project to a specified audio file format.

The competition evaluates teams in the integrated manufacturing technology fields of computer aided drafting/design (CAD), computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer numerical controlled machining (CNC). CAD operators construct the part geometry; the CAM operator generates the tool paths; and the CNC operator sets up and machines the part.

The competition is consistent with the automotive maintenance and light repair task list outlined in the guidelines published by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and the ASE Education Foundation. Competitors demonstrate their ability to perform tasks selected from the standards mentioned above as determined by the SkillsUSA Championships Technical Committee. ( High School Only )

The competition is consistent with the automobile technician task list outlined in guidelines published by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and the ASE Education Foundation. Competitors demonstrate their ability to perform tasks selected from the standards mentioned above as determined by the SkillsUSA Championships Technical Committee.

Competitors are challenged to meet production and quality standards expected by industry. The competition includes a written examination and practical exercises. Competitors demonstrate their knowledge and skills through scaling, mixing, preparing, and baking products. The products include, but may not be limited to, breads, rolls, cookies, and assorted pastries. The student must also demonstrate cake decorating skills. The competitor must work efficiently to produce quality products in a job-like setting.

Competitors demonstrate their knowledge and ability to perform entry-level procedures or skills based on the following list of core standards: academic foundations, communication skills, career opportunity concepts and systems, employability and teamworking, ethical and legal issues, and safety practices. Performance will be evaluated through various stations involving skills testing and both written and verbal assessments. ( High School Only )

Competitors build a small cabinet or piece of furniture from the supplied materials and drawings. Competitors are expected to read the drawings, lay out, create a cut list, and cut the parts using a variety of tools including, but not limited to, the following: table saw, miter saw, drill, hinge boring machine, and various hand tools. The parts must be accurately assembled, sanded, and adjusted to tolerances specified by the judges.

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project).

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Arts and Communication based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project).

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Business Management and Technology based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project). The following career clusters are represented in this competition: Business Management and Administration; Finance; Information Technology; and Marketing.

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Health Science based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project).

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Human Services based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project). The following career clusters are represented in this competition: Government and Public Administration; Law, Public Safety and Security; Education and Training Services; Human Services; and Hospitality and Tourism.

Student teams use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their Career Cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within the community to explain their training and project. This competition will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community, and display and presentation techniques. Teams must be entered in the appropriate Career Pathways – Industrial and Engineering Technology based on the course enrollment of the students (not on the content of the project). The following career clusters are represented in this competition: Architecture and Construction; Manufacturing; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics; and Transportation Distribution and Logistics.

Competitors frame walls using wood and/or steel studs, cut and install rafters, gable end overhangs, fascia board and soffit installation, install sheathing and/or exterior siding and trim. Demonstration of knowledge of stair construction is required. Competitors will be judged on accuracy, ability to read and interpret blueprints, workmanship, safety, and the proper use of tools, equipment, and materials.

(Team of 3) SkillsUSA student members build a three-dimensional display that articulates the annual SkillsUSA competition theme. The members of the chapter build the display and three students present information about the display during a presentation and interview with judges.

This competition evaluates each competitor’s ability to independently plan and program jobs for CNC (Computer Numerical Control) turning centers and provide instructions for operators to execute. Competitors program part features and generate NC code using CAM software, troubleshoot G-code programming errors, interpret prints (including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing or GD&T), measure/gauge parts, and demonstrate their theoretical knowledge of CNC turning center configuration, setup, and operation.

This competition evaluates each competitor’s ability to independently plan and program jobs for CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling machines and provide instructions for operators to execute. Competitors program part features and generate NC code using CAM software, troubleshoot G-code programming errors, interpret prints (including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing or GD&T), measure/gauge parts, and demonstrate their theoretical knowledge of CNC milling machine configuration, setup, and operation.

This competition evaluates each competitor’s ability to independently plan and program jobs for 5-Axis CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling machines and provide instructions for operators to execute. Competitors program part features and generate NC code using CAM software, troubleshoot G-code programming errors, interpret prints (including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing or GD&T), measure/gauge parts, and demonstrate their theoretical knowledge of 5-Axis CNC milling machine configuration, setup, and operation.

This competition evaluates each competitor’s ability to independently plan and program jobs for 2-Axis CNC (Computer Numerical Control) turning centers and 3-Axis CNC milling machines and provide instructions for operators to execute. Competitors program part features and generate NC code using CAM software, troubleshoot G-code programming errors, interpret prints (including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing or GD&T), measure/gauge parts, and demonstrate their theoretical knowledge of CNC turning center and milling machine configuration, setup, and operation.

Competitors will install the most commonly used roof type, thermoplastic, on the same mockup used for NRCA’s ProCertification exam. Participants will put on all required safety equipment, roll out a sheet of thermoplastic membrane, mechanically attach it to the deck, flash the perimeter edge wall, and flash around a box and pipe boot. Contest involves a written test, which is the same as the exam for NRCA’s TRAC: Thermoplastic course.

A team of two students must develop, execute, document and present a completed community service project that provides a benefit to the community or the school and demonstrates excellence and professionalism. The project may be a larger school/community project; however, two students must be part of the core organization team and document the project and results based on the guidelines in the technical standards. A letter from an appropriate school official on school letterhead stating that the competitor is classified under the provisions of Public Law 105-17, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1997, is required for participation.

The Community Service competition evaluates local chapter activities that benefit their communities while members become productive community members. SkillsUSA chapters present their best community service project for the current school year. Competitors are evaluated on a professional portfolio that details their chapter’s community service project and on a presentation to a panel of judges. The competencies that are evaluated are based on the team’s professionalism in the visual representation of the project, designing and implementing an engaging presentation, and effective delivery of that presentation.

Competitors demonstrate knowledge of computer programming, describe how programs and programming languages work, and describe the purposes and practices of structured programming. The competition may include a computer programming problem consisting of background information and program specifications. An appropriate (successfully executable) computer program from design notes and instructions will be developed.

Students demonstrate their skills in hair color, haircutting, hair styling, and long hair design in separate assessments. All work is performed on mannequins, so each competitor begins with the same model and the same type of hair. Competitors will perform one women’s cut and one men’s cut from a finished photo. They will also create one uniform layered haircut. A display of creativity is seen in the long hair segment of the competition where these future salon professionals demonstrate their own design skills. A parade finale closes the competition with each competitor walking down the stage with their completed mannequins to present to the audience.

Contestants will demonstrate basic skills associated with working a crime scene. Team members will take a test assessing overall crime scene knowledge. Team members will process a crime scene to include searching, identifying evidence, measuring, photographing, and preparing a sketch. Team members will also demonstrate basic crime scene skills such as lifting a fingerprint, swabbing serological evidence, packaging evidence, or similar skills. The team will interpret common crime scene evidence such as classifying a fingerprint pattern. Finally, the team will complete narratives, crime logs, and similar paperwork.

This competition is for students preparing to be police officers or to work in other areas of criminal justice. This competition will utilize both written examination and practical exercises to evaluate the competitors’ abilities and knowledge of the field. The competitors are scored on their knowledge and application of U.S. Constitutional Law, written and verbal communications skills, and their ability to handle an entry-level law enforcement position.

The competition will encompass both hot and cold food preparation and presentation. Competitors will demonstrate their knowledge and skills through the production of menu items meeting industry standards. The competitors are evaluated on organization, knife skills, cooking techniques, creative presentation, sanitation and food safety, and the quality and flavor of their prepared items. High school competitors will create menus to demonstrate required fundamental cooking techniques using items from a common pantry. College/postsecondary students will work from a market basket format and create their own menus using required fundamental cooking techniques.

The competition evaluates students’ proficiency in providing customer service. The competition involves live role-playing situations. Competitors demonstrate their ability to perform customer service in both written and oral forms including telephone and computer skills, communications, problem solving, conflict resolution, and business etiquette.

Competitors cycle through stations testing and troubleshooting engines, electrical and electronics systems, and powertrain systems including chassis, transmissions, and carriers. Competitors demonstrate skills in hydraulic systems, vehicle inspections, fundamental failure analysis, brake systems, air-conditioning systems, and general shop skills. Competitors also perform a job interview and complete a written test.

The competition evaluates and recognizes outstanding students for excellence and professionalism in filmmaking in the areas of development, pre-production, production, and postproduction through the writing, producing, directing, and editing of an up to five-minute short film based on the prompt given.

Competitors demonstrate their knowledge of developmentally appropriate practice and their ability to prepare and implement learning activities for children three to five years old. Competitors will prepare a written lesson plan and take a written test assessing their knowledge of child development and effective teaching strategies. They will demonstrate their understanding of the unique age-related learning characteristics of young children and the relevant social interactions as they implement the lesson.

Competitors are required to complete a written test of questions formulated from the latest edition of the National Electric Code (NEC), a practical conduit bending exercise, and hands-on installation of a conduit system, cabling system, and wiring devices. Working from drawings and specification sheets, competitors are required to install an electrical system common in most residential and light commercial projects. Judging is based on general workmanship, accuracy of layout and installation, and adherence to the current NEC and standard industry safe practices.

The competition is divided into sections: customer service exam, written exam, soldering, breadboarding, and troubleshooting. Competitors demonstrate their knowledge of analog and digital circuitry; ability to troubleshoot electronic circuits; ability to construct and test experimental circuits; and ability to design and select circuit components. All aspects of the competition test competitors’ abilities to use and calibrate electronic equipment, record and organize data, and demonstrate proper safety practices.

The competition evaluates knowledge and skills required for competent practice within the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) field. The event will simulate situations encountered by emergency medical professionals that include either a medical or trauma clinical scenario. Each scenario will require the use of critical thinking skills, communication, and demonstration of professionalism.

(Team of 3) Students demonstrate their ability to design an innovative engineering project and present those ideas along with a display and live model. During the presentation, students are judged on their performance as a professional team, presentation of their project to a panel of judges from the engineering field, their storyboard presentation model, and the overall effect of the presentation.

A team event testing students’ knowledge in starting their own businesses by developing business plans that identify needed products or services in a local market. Emphasis is placed on financial planning and practicality of the product/service. Teams give oral presentations based upon their written plans, and the team must successfully answer judges’ questions in response to typical problems encountered by entrepreneurs during their first year of business.

The competitors are evaluated on their techniques and professionalism in the field of skin care. Competitors are tested in different soft skill tasks including a written knowledge exam covering the fundamentals of skin care and oral professional presentation. Additionally, competitors are evaluated on technical skill performance tasks consisting of a facial cleansing massage; basic facial; beauty makeup; and fantasy makeup applications. An emphasis on safety and infection control measures will be used in all segments of the skill performance areas.

The competition requires competitors to give a three- to five-minute speech on an assigned topic with five minutes of advance preparation. Competitors enter the preparation area one at a time, where they are given a speech topic. They are judged on voice, mechanics, platform deportment, organization, and effectiveness.

The competition evaluates the competitor’s preparation for firefighting careers through hands-on skill demonstrations and both written and oral presentations. Areas tested include safety; breathing apparatus; fire streams; ladders, ropes, knots and hoses; fire control; ventilation; emergency medical care and rescue; and protecting fire cause evidence.

Evaluates a competitor’s ability to perform procedures or take appropriate action based on scenarios presented related to CPR (Adult/AED, 2-man system, child and infant CPR) first aid medical emergencies (mock scenarios will be performed by a single competitor as instructed by judges). There is also a written exam. All skills are judged on 2020 nationally accepted standards identified by The American Red Cross, The American Heart Association, The American Safety and Health Institute, and The National Safety Council for Basic Life Support and First Aid.

This competition consists of the following segments: preparing a job and printing it with a digital printing device, creating and preflighting a print-ready file using Adobe software, performing exercises with offset press simulator software, solving production planning challenges, and taking a graphic arts knowledge test.

Competitors are evaluated on their understanding of employment procedures faced in applying for positions in the occupational areas in which they are training. The competition is divided into phases, including the following: completion of employment application; introduction scenario with a receptionist; and an in-depth interview(s).

Competitors demonstrate and explain an entry-level skill used in the occupational area for which they are training. The competition requires a demonstration performing an occupational skill accompanied by a clear explanation of the topic using experiments, displays or practical operations.

Competitors demonstrate and explain an entry-level technical skill used either in the occupational area for which he or she is training or outside the training area. The competition requires a demonstration performing an occupational skill accompanied by a clear explanation of the topic using experiments, displays or practical operations.

The competition highlights skills training in masonry, spotlights the industry’s finest masons and focuses attention on careers in the masonry industry. Competitors are expected to construct a composite brick and block project in a six-hour period that tests their ability to meet industry standards in quality. In addition to a written exam, students are judged on the most frequently used details in masonry construction.

The competition requires competitors to have the ability to understand complex systems that integrate various elements in the mechanical, fluid power and controls domain, combined with the ability to work in a team environment with people with different areas of expertise. Mechatronic specialists must have well developed skills in pneumatic technology, electrical and electronics systems, mechanical systems, and general automation techniques and practices, including systematic troubleshooting methods. This competition consists of events designed to measure the skills required in the modern automated manufacturing environment. Competitors are required to assemble, adjust and test an automated machine system, troubleshoot and repair a faulty machine system, and take a comprehensive written test. The competition elements have been designed to be as realistic as possible, closely resembling the tasks and activities of modern automation professionals. In addition, there is an individual oral interview. Teams are required to provide their own PLC that will be used in the construction phase.

(Team of 2) The competition includes activities that simulate situations encountered by robotic programmers and support professionals. Teams are given a task to solve using a mobile robotic system that is built ahead of time and brought to the competition. Teams will have two scored chances to solve the mobile robotic challenge and will be given a design and programming interview. Once a team has performed the required task or set of tasks, a design change may be introduced. Competitors are required to adhere to industry safety standards using the hardware and software they have selected.

For more information, check out the Middle School Game Manual and the High School and College/Postsecondary Game Manual related to this competition.

The competition evaluates the competitor’s ability to perform the most common nail services found in today’s salons. The competition consists of separate segments: oral communication skills; acrylic application; tip and light-cured enhancement overlay application; nail polish application; nail art; pedicuring and a written exam. The written exam tests basic knowledge of proper sanitation, chemical safety, salon procedures, etc.

(Team of 7) This teamwork and oral presentation competition evaluates a team’s understanding of the symbolic representation of the colors and assembled parts of the SkillsUSA emblem. Each team includes seven registered members in the roles of president, vice president, parliamentarian, reporter, treasurer, secretary and historian.

Competitors in the Photography competition are put through a series of real-world scenarios and are judged on their overall mastery of the following skills: understanding the features of today’s digital SLR or mirrorless cameras, field assignment, producing a contact sheet, producing a composited digital fine art piece from their field assignment, question written test, portrait/commercial studio using strobes, troubleshooting common photo errors, print competition, and job interview.

Students present their winning state conference pin and artwork and participate in an oral presentation regarding all aspects of the creation of their design. Competitors will explain how the pin represents their state, its unique qualities and why another SkillsUSA student or adult member would want to wear the pin. The competitor will create a tabletop display that represents the process they used to create the design.

The competition is consistent with the power equipment technology standards for multi-category accreditation task list outlined in Sections 3 thru 7, published by the Equipment & Engine Training Council (EETC). Competitors perform tasks representative of those encountered in a dealership’s service department. As the competitors rotate through the various stations, they are judged and scored on technical and oral skills. Competitors must demonstrate excellent customer service skills, safe work practices, cleanliness, organization, accuracy, speed, and completion of assigned tasks. The hands-on stations include many aspects of two-stroke, four-stroke, compact diesel engines, and battery-powered equipment and their associated mechanical, hydraulic and electrical systems.

The Quiz Bowl competition tests a team of five to seven competitors on their ability to quickly respond to knowledge questions covering academics, current events and SkillsUSA professional development curriculum. Teams will demonstrate communication skills, teamwork, problem solving and time-management skills by determining and presenting the answer to each question clearly within the five-second time frame. Each competitor will take two written tests. One will be a written Quiz Bowl test covering general academic and current events issues. The other will be the national SkillsUSA Professional Development Test.

Through a written test, competitors demonstrate the skills required to solve mathematical problems correctly that are commonly found in the skilled trades and professional and technical occupations. Skills demonstrated include addition; subtraction; multiplication; division of whole numbers; fractions and decimals; applied word problems; percentages; ratio proportions; averages; area; volume; metric measures; and traditional (Imperial) measures and trigonometry.

Competitors are tested on skills required in the front of the house of a fine dining restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Competitors are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.

(Team of 2) Teams are required to build a robot and arm mechanism prior to the competition. The robot must be capable of locating, grabbing and moving simulated ordnances on the challenge course. This competition assesses proficiencies such as remotely operating the robot via camera, navigation, manipulating the arm mechanism to collect simulated ordnances, traversing various types of terrain, and communication between driver and spotter. Find more information in the Robotics: Urban Search and Rescue Challenge Guide 2023.

Students present their winning state conference T-shirt and create a professional portfolio that documents the process used to create the design. Competitors will participate in an oral presentation regarding all aspects of the creation of their design and explain how the T-shirt represents their state, its unique qualities and why another SkillsUSA student or adult member would want to wear the shirt.

(Team of 4) Competitors work together to build a construction project over two days that demonstrates their ability to work as a team. Each team will be required to understand the project elements based on a detailed blueprint and special instructions presented at the pre-competition orientation. Each team must then write a project completion action plan and present their plan as one of the key elements of the competition (all team members must participate in the presentation). During the construction project, the team demonstrates their ability to work together by using their carpentry, roofing, electrical, plumbing and masonry skills. Judging is based on the team’s presentation skills, ability to construct the project per competition specified building codes, jobsite safety and cleanliness, organized and correct ordering of materials from the competition material depot, proper use and accountability of tools and equipment and the rate of completion of the project.

The competition evaluates a competitor’s preparation for employment and recognizes outstanding students for excellence and professionalism in the field of technical drafting. The competition will focus on the solution of industry-developed problems by applying appropriate technical drafting skills and tools including computer-aided drafting (CAD).

(Team of 2) Competitors are required to plan and shoot a video (generally 30 seconds or one minute in length) on location to convey the theme of the event. Editing is done in the competition area with special emphasis on professional production of the video by industry standards, quality of audio and video and adequate conveyance of the theme to the viewer of the final piece.

(Team of 2) Teams complete a series of challenges focusing on creating a website for a client and a specific target audience. Judging will focus on meeting the client’s needs, usability and accessibility, and industry-standard best practices. Teams will also be evaluated on the process they use to meet the challenges and how well they work as a team. Teams will need Internet access as all competition materials (including the coding environment) will only be available online.

This competition requires a team of three students to use their welding and fabrication skills to build a designed project from the provided material. The project is constructed by the competitors based on provided prints. Teams should be skilled in the following welding and cutting processes: SMAW, GTAW, GMAW, FCAW / OFC and PAC. The students are also required to be proficient in using common tools of a workshop.

Competitors demonstrate their ability to design and produce a welded sculpture and to describe all aspects of the creation of their design. Welded sculptures are displayed for the national competition along with a professional portfolio documenting evidence of creating the original work. Each participant is interviewed regarding the design and creation of the piece. The introduction of an onsite welding component will be demonstrated in the 2023 competition and scored in 2024.

Competitors receive competition drawings and a set of welding procedure specifications that conform to the latest edition of the American Welding Society standards. At a series of stations, competitors are tested on various aspects of welding: measuring weld replicas, using weld measuring gauges; laying out a plate and using oxy-acetylene equipment to cut several holes that are checked for accuracy and quality; gas metal arc welding (GMAW) on steel making welds in various positions using short circuiting transfers; flux cored arc welding (FCAW) using a shielding gas, making welds in various positions and, using a combination machine capable of providing the correct welding current for shielded metal arc (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Competitors complete the steel project and weld an aluminum project in various positions using a variety of filler metals.

Oregon-Only Events

The following are Oregon-only events and not eligible for National Conference:

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